Lucky Star Farms

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lucky_star_ranch
Lucky Star Farms
No longer in operation


The Lucky Star horse farm closed about two years ago and has begun the process of deterioration. These barns seem to know when they are not occupied, they start to fall apart almost right away. I never noticed any roof shingles missing when the ranch was open, but just a few months after it closed, the shingles started to fall off! Coincidence - of course - but it does seem strange that the roof of a barn can remain intact for 40 years of more without any maintenance, but as soon as the farm closes, the structure falls into disrepair.

3 comments:

PattiD said...

This used to be a very old hog barn converted into a beautiful horse barn. Another modern barn was built on the property. There was a penthouse erected upside the old barn with a western sky view. There were also two other residences. Thru the 1990's I worked & managed Lucky Star Farm. It may look as tho it's falling apart now but many storms caused many roof holes & many fallen shingles. Jack & Tony saw to those repairs & giant magnets were used to gather fallen nails so the horses wouldn't step on them. "Love of Job" is what I think it's called...A lot of love & a lot more hard work goes into a horse stable. You can see that as you look west to another vacant stable & round barn. Or as you look a few blocks south to a development that used to be Harlan Farms owned by DR. David Smith. I left Lucky Star Farm for a job with medical benefits. Now disabled, medical insurance coverage is about as rare as a thriving horse stable. As a former Palos Hills horse property owner it appears that in the 21st century everyone's moving to the burbs to get away from the city but no one wants horses for neighbors.

lapstrake said...

Thanks for the information pattid!

I love the stories behind the barns, but I usually can't get any info. - especially on the abandoned ones.
Your comment about Jack and Tony are exactly what I was trying to say - it's funny how the barns just seem to fall apart as soon as they are abandoned. Jack and Tony certainly did a good job at keeping up the farm - that's what's so depressing to me. I would pass this barn everyday and see the horses grazing. But as soon as it closed, it started to degrade. That is a testament to Jack and Tony's hard work.

lapstrake said...

You wouldn't be the Patti that once worked a McCrory's in Chicago would you?